Uwemba-Pastilles® Immune-Booster Complex

Uwemba-Pastilles® Immune-Booster Complex

Support for your immune system*

Food supplement made from 10 different plants and zinc.

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Pack size:
120 pastilles à 530mg
Pharmacode:
7824259
Available online or in a pharmacy / drugstore.

Composition

The ingredients of Uwemba-Pastilles® Immune-Booster Complex consist of:

  • Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium)
  • Clove (Caryophylli flos)
  • Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus)
  • Meadowsweet flowers (Spiraea ulmaria)
  • Melon tree leaves (Carica papaya)
  • Rosemary (Rosmarini folia)
  • Purple coneflower (Echinaceae purpurea)
  • Black cumin (Nigella sativa)
  • Thyme (Thymus vulgaris)
  • Chebulic myrobalan (Terminalia chebula)

Dosage

Uwemba-Pastilles® Immune-Booster Complex are suitable for regular use (120 pastilles = 40 days) and/or as a daily dietary supplement. Take 3 pastilles daily, one before each main meal with some liquid. For use in adults and children over 12 years.

* Zinc contributes to normal immune system function.

Immune Booster Complex Tab

(1) % of the reference quantity for daily intake according to Regulation (EC) No. 1169/2011.

Strong defense through the cold and dull season

Uwemba-Pastilles® Immune-Booster Complex consist of zinc and ten plants that have a positive influence on the body’s defenses. Uwemba-Pastilles® benefit holistically, activate the metabolism and provide more vitality. Especially in the cold and gloomy season Uwemba pastilles are suitable for strengthening the immune system. But they can also be taken preventively and for convalescence.

The purely natural plant mixture with zinc gluconate provides the organism with minerals that are often not found in sufficient quantities in our food nowadays.

Note

Food supplements are not a substitute for a varied, balanced diet, fresh fruits and vegetables and a healthy lifestyle. Store in a cool, dry place out of the reach of children. Do not exceed recommended dosage.

Ingredients

Artemisia absinthium

Wormwood

Artemisia absinthium

Origin

Wormwood was already mentioned by the ancient Egyptians in the papyrus Eber under the name Saam. Later Hildegard von Bingen called it one of the most valuable medicinal plants. Accordingly, it was used against many diseases such as cholera, plague, paralysis, poisoning, eye inflammation, yellow fever.

Wormwood also had a place in the environment of early, sporting competitions: in ancient Rome, the winner of a chariot race received a cup of wormwood as a prize.

Use in folk medicine

Traditionally, wormwood is considered to be stomachic, appetizing, diuretic and digestive. In naturopathy it is used, for example, for bloating, disturbances of the bile flow, loss of appetite, general digestive complaints, Crohn’s disease, flatulence, gastritis, strengthening the immune system strengthening of the immune system, heartburn prescribed.

Artemisia absinthium
Wormwood
Artemisia absinthium

Origin

Wormwood was already mentioned by the ancient Egyptians in the papyrus Eber under the name Saam. Later Hildegard von Bingen called it one of the most valuable medicinal plants. Accordingly, it was used against many diseases such as cholera, plague, paralysis, poisoning, eye inflammation, yellow fever.

Wormwood also had a place in the environment of early, sporting competitions: in ancient Rome, the winner of a chariot race received a cup of wormwood as a prize.

Use in folk medicine

Traditionally, wormwood is considered to be stomachic, appetizing, diuretic and digestive. In naturopathy it is used, for example, for bloating, disturbances of the bile flow, loss of appetite, general digestive complaints, Crohn’s disease, flatulence, gastritis, strengthening the immune system strengthening of the immune system, heartburn prescribed.

Gewürznelke
Clove
Caryophylli flos

Origin

Cloves have been used in cooking since time immemorial. They are used for food preservation and in medicine. Originally from Indonesia, the plant is now grown in various places around the world, including South America such as Brazil. Cloves have great potential for pharmaceutical, cosmetic, food and agricultural applications. Medicinal uses include mainly toothache, oral hygiene and sore throat.

In Persia and China, it was said to have aphrodisiac properties.

Use in folk medicine

Over the centuries, cloves have been used against diarrhoea, for liver, stomach and intestinal complaints and as a stimulant for the nerves, but they are also used to treat flatulence, nausea and vomiting. In tropical Asia, cloves were used to treat various infections such as malaria, cholera and tuberculosis, and also scabies. Especially in America, cloves are known to fight worms, viruses, candida, various bacterial and protozoan infections.

Kapuzinerkresse (Tropaeolum majus)
Nasturtium
Tropaeolum majus

Origin

Nasturtium is unknown in the wild. However, it is the most commonly cultivated species of Tropaeolaceae. The plant came to the Netherlands from Peru in the late 17th century.

Use in folk medicine

In folk medicine, nasturtium is said to have an anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effect. It is used as a food and spice and is also a plant antibiotic. It is therefore often used to treat infectious diseases such as urinary tract infections and colds. It is also used in folk medicine as an irritant for scrofulous diseases and as a skin disinfectant. As a salad, it has a blood-cleansing effect. Nasturtium is said to activate the body’s own defences.

Mädesüssblüten (Spiraea ulmaria)
Meadowsweet flowers
Spiraea ulmaria

Origin

Meadowsweet is a perennial herb that occurs in wild and cultivated habitats in Europe and Asia. There is hardly any written tradition about this ancient medicinal plant from ancient times or the Middle Ages. It was the naturalist and physician Adam Lonicerus (1528-1586) who first described the healing powers of meadowsweet as effective against rheumatic diseases and diarrhoea. Due to its salicin content, the name of aspirin was derived from this plant. “A-” from acetyl and “-spirin” from Spirea ulmaria.

Use in folk medicine

The use of meadowsweet in traditional medicine is based on its diuretic, astringent, anti-rheumatic and anti-inflammatory properties. It is traditionally used in most European countries to treat inflammatory diseases because of its antipyretic, analgesic, astringent and anti-rheumatic effects.

Melonenbaumblätter (Carica papaya)
Melon tree leaves
Carica papaya

Origin

The papaya actually comes from the coastal regions and lowlands of Central and South America. The name papaya comes from the language of the Arawak Indians. At the beginning of the 16th century, the Spanish started cultivating these plants in the Antilles and the Philippines, among other places. Today it is cultivated worldwide in the tropics and subtropics, e.g. in Australia and India.

Use in folk medicine

Papaya is a popular and important fruit tree in tropical and subtropical parts of the world. Its tasty fruit is consumed fresh or sold as a processed product worldwide. All parts of the plant – fruit, root, bark, peel, seeds and pulp – are also known for their medicinal properties. Many of the benefits of papaya can be attributed to its high vitamin A, B and C content. Proteolytic enzymes like papain and chymopapain, which have antiviral, antifungal and antibacterial properties, round off the profile. In recent years, important insights have been gained into the biological activity and medicinal use of papaya. Today, it is considered a valuable neutraceutical fruit plant.

Rosmarin (Rosmarini folia)
Rosemary
Rosmarini folia

Origin

Already Dioscorides described rosemary with its aromatic smell as a plant with warming power, which was used by means of ointments against jaundice. In the northern European medicine of the Middle Ages, it was known as a remedy for toothache, pain of the liver and intestines, and generally for internal pain. In the herbal book of the Bern city physician Otto Brunfels (1488-1534) is written: “Rosemary strengthens the weak heart, promotes blood circulation, helps with fainting, warms the cold legs and helps with pain of the uterus”. He saw not only the circulatory but also the antispasmodic properties of the medicinal herb. These properties were confirmed in clinical studies in modern times.

Use in folk medicine

Its essence is to fire up, give energy and warm through. In folk medicine, the circulatory properties of rosemary are well known. It has a tonic effect on the cardiovascular and nervous systems, supporting blood circulation in the coronary arteries and thus cardiac activity. This confirms its reputation as a herb that promotes blood circulation and stimulates the circulatory system. In addition, it has digestive, appetite stimulating, antimicrobial, antiviral, antispasmodic, antidiabetic, liver protecting, anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory effects.

Roter Sonnenhut (Echinaceae purpurea)
Purple coneflower
Echinaceae purpurea

Origin

An ancient medicinal plant, coneflower is one of the most popular and widely cultivated medicinal plants in North America. It was used early by Native Americans for various ailments, including sore throats, coughs, and snakebites. Among immigrants, the plant was not known until about the 1800s. After that, the root extract became widely used for blood purification and against infections, and became very popular in the early 20th century.

Use in folk medicine

In folk medicine it is used for respiratory and urinary tract infections. In addition, it is suitable for wound healing.

Heilpflanze Schwarzkümmel
Black Cumin
Nigella sativa

Origin

Originally, black cumin comes from Western Asia, Iraq and Turkey. It also grows in Southern Europe, India, Pakistan and North Africa.

In the Orient, it has been used as a spice and in medicine for over 3,500 years. Ancient Babylonian and Roman healers alike resorted to it. Dioscorides described the plant as a poultice for headaches, against liver spots, hardening and leprosy. Black cumin was also recommended to promote milk secretion and also against snakebites. In Europe, it became known as black coriander in the Middle Ages and was used for similar ailments as it once was in ancient times.

Use in folk medicine

In European folk medicine, black cumin is very well known as a medicinal plant. Among other things, it has an anti-inflammatory effect, cholesterol-lowering, analgesic, blood sugar-lowering, neuroprotective, anti-anxiety, antibacterial, skin-protective and antioxidant.

Thymian (Thymus vulgaris)
Thyme
Thymus vulgaris

Origin

Thyme is native to the western, European Mediterranean region. It has long been used as a medicinal and spice plant and played a major role in ancient and medieval medicine. Hildegard von Bingen recommended the herb for respiratory distress or whooping cough. In older herbal books, thyme was recommended for many ailments: chest pain, appetite stimulation, digestive problems, warts or wound treatment. It is used as honey, pure, as a poultice, in vinegar or in wine.

Use in folk medicine

The popularity in folk medicine goes back to a wide range of effects. Thyme is antibacterial, partly antiviral, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, expectorant, antipyretic, analgesic, appetizing, digestive and immune stimulant.

Chebulische Myrobalane (Terminalia Chebula)
Chebulic Myrobalan
Terminalia Chebula

Origin

Chebulic myrobalan, also known as Haritaki, belongs to the winged-seed family. The evergreen tree with a height of 15-25 meters tree is found in India, Nepal, Tibet, Sri Lanka and other countries. In Tibet, the plant is called, among other things, the “fruit of long life”. In Uwemba-Pastilles® Immune-Booster Complex the dried fruit is used.

The fruit has been known in Chinese medicine since the 11th century. In India, Haritaki is a very important plant dedicated to the god Shiva. The fruit contains tannins, triterpenic acids, arjunetin and arjunin.

Use in folk medicine

In traditional Chinese medicine, the fruit has been attributed with digestive properties that support the large intestine. The plant is also known for its laxative, hemostatic, antipurulent, cough-irritant, and gum-strengthening properties.

Die Qualität der Uwemba-Pastilles®

Unter GMP-Richtlinien hergestellt, analysiert und freigegeben

Wir bürgen für unsere gute Herstellungspraxis!
Deshalb arbeiten wir nach den Richtlinien der Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) – den europäischen Standards für die Qualitätssicherung bei der Herstellung von Arzneimitteln und Nahrungsmittelergänzungen.

Good Manufacturing Practice

Schonende Verarbeitung der Pflanzen und überwiegend Bio-Qualität

Jede unserer Pflanzen benötigt eigene klimatische Bedingungen, deshalb werden sie auf der ganzen Welt angepflanzt. So stammt die Beifußpflanze Artemisia aus der Benediktiner-Mission in Tansania. In Zusammenarbeit mit den regionalen Herstellern achten wir auf Nachhaltigkeit und biologischen Anbau.

Unsere Produkte bestehen aus Pflanzenbestandteilen, die sich gegenseitig in ihrem Nutzen ergänzen. Noch im Anbauland werden die Pflanzenteile mit hoher Wirksamkeit verlesen und bei ihrer Anlieferung in die Schweiz streng auf mögliche mikrobiologische Verunreinigungen geprüft.

Die Pflanzen werden in der Schweiz verarbeitet, schonend und energieeffizient gemahlen und zu Kräuterpastillen gepresst. Somit überwachen wir den gesamten Prozess der Herstellung nach europäischen Qualitätsstandards und stellen sicher, dass keine Schadstoffe enthalten sind.

Qualität aus der Schweiz – hohe Qualität und Zuverlässigkeit

Produkte aus der Schweiz sind bekannt für ihre Qualität. Diese Schweizer Qualität ist für uns eine Verpflichtung! Wir garantieren Ihnen die höchsten Standards bei der Herstellung und eine konstant hohe Qualität und Zuverlässigkeit unserer Produkte!

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